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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 53 (some duplicates have been removed)
didn't see anything like what we saw during the twilight of the john paul years, with the series of hospitalizations here in rome, or sort of spectacular public collapses, i think it's more simply that benedict xvi's diagnosis is that he's going to be celebrating his 86th birthday in april. we have seen him pairing back public commitments and so on. he believes that the energy required to lead the catholic church forward at this moment is beyond his capacities. and i think he's decided therefore, not to wait for a moment of crisis, but while he's still capable of doing so, to make the decision to step aside and let somebody else take the baton. >> reverend martin, people are using words like shocking, unprecedented, why is this such a surprise? why didn't anybody expect this except for his inner circle? >> well, it hasn't happened for centuries, and you know, as john allen was saying, there had been speculation, there was speculation about john paul ii and people knew benedict was frail and in a sense diminishing physically, but i think the fact it hadn't happened so long means i
wanted to retire when he worked for john paul ii, asked him, john 35u8 ii, would not let that happen. he became pope after john paul ii died, but he never seemed to enjoy it the way john paul ii did, who was an actor. benedict is a scholar, a theologian, an intellectual, and today you could see the humility that those who know him very well say have always marked this 85-year-old man. >> certainly describing himself as a pilgrim is really extraordinary, and you get the feeling that the crowd, the audiences were responding to him in an emotional way that they hadn't previously. that i guess it's the moment the history, but also the sadness. i mean, this is a very bittersweet moment. >> well, it's -- it is. that's exactly the way to describe it. you know, it's interesting in st. peters square, they had the big jumbotrons out there, and people were gathered around and were actually silent in st. peters square watching what happened, and the last time i heard that kind of silence in st. peters square it was when they announced the death of john paul ii. you never heard a cell phone go off. y
step down. it's something that nobody's even considered in modern times. even john paul 2 who was much more ill or much more tired looking and ill, of course. he was very ill than pope benedict xvi looks and he said i had enough of this and just going to retire and read and live a spiritual life until the end and leave it with somebody younger and stamina. who that guy or pope will be, we don't know yet. we'll know soon. >> all right. thank you very much, claudio. let's bring in nbc news vatican analyst george wigle and father thomas at georgetown university. gentlemen, thank you so much for joining us. george, you have been on air all pretty much throughout the day. your initial reaction to this news, especially knowing what the pope said two years ago? >> i wasn't surprised at the fact, tamron. but i was a little surprised at the timing but the more i think about it during the day, the fact that the pope has done this in such a way that the college of cardinals will be meeting during lent, a traditional season of reflection, self examination, examination of conscious, if you will. in
for the funeral of john paul back in 2005. that was a funeral and this is a different time in the church. the pope is driving through st. peter's square to wave to the faithful. he will have another meeting with cardinals in the morning. he will be speaking to his -- to the people that will select a successor. this is the last time that the pope will have such direct contact with the people. he is driving around among the crowd. a little earlier, the last speech that he will make in front of the people. many issues, he talked about truth. that is interesting when we consider all the things that have been coming out of the vatican and how many people suspect the pope is standing down because he is not strong enough to get a handle all the things happening within the vatican. let's speak to our resident vatican experts. you're listening to that speech about half an hour ago. what did you think were the most notable passages? >> it is importance -- it is important the weight of the papacy. >> there was one bed where he mentioned the dual role of the -- one bit worried mentions the dual role of the po
's -- he succeeded pope john paul ii who was extremely popular and who reigned for over 20 years and did extensive amounts of traveling endured especially by young -- endeared especially by young people and there was an assassination attempt on him and he forgave the person who wanted it three to -- who wanted to try to shoot hill. it's been an interesting reign for the pope. it's just about to end. >> they say many at the vatican were stunned by the news he was resigning. there were others who saw it as a sign of humility and humanity, a fact that he was being rationle that he didn't feel he would -- rational, that he didn't feel he would do the job anymore. >> and there were concerns that he couldn't deal with some of the scandals that started to rock the catholic church. he just maintained it was for his health and purely humble reasons that he wanted to step down and step april side. once again, a -- aside. once again a beautiful picture from the helipad. which i guess you don't see very often outside of the vatican, outside of the walls of vatican. >> as we watch these live picture,
's a surprise to me. when pope john pal pope john paul iiwas was ailing they said it was possible for a pope to resign, but i didn't expect it. i think the timing was a surprise if nothing else. >> john: indeed, we heard of his schedule of travel and meetings has not been altered and it has caught even his closest associates by surprise. he referred to the sexual scandals as fifth in the church and that's that's a filth that cost the church. do you think that has anything to do with his resigning? >> that is possible. the number of children and families that have been devastated by it is horrific. we can't really put a price tag on that. i think maybe that weighed on the pope to some extent. the fact that atoning for that sin has been something that the church has not effectively done, the leadership has not effectively done, and we need to do more. >> john: to say nothing of the amount of lay people and catholic who is were driven away from the church in disgust of how it was handled all those years. >> absolutely. the fact that it was hidden, and that perpetrators were just moved around ha
to do that. and that's why i think this particular move, very counterproductive. >> senators john paul and john mccain slammed the white house allegedly for leaking the plan on purpose. >> this is the prosecutor pea doing his own plan. it shows me he's really not serious. when they come out and say my way or the highway and if congress doesn't ask be with i'll put it on the desk and say pass it now, that's no way to get it done. but it seems to me to show the president really doesn't want immigration reform. >> leaks don't happen in washington by accident. this races the question that many of us continue to wonder about. does the president really want a result or does he want another reason to beat up republicans so he can get political advantage in the next election? >> he argued the white house plan and bipartisan negotiations shared some key elements. >> republican, this was leaked. it's also clear that it's incomplete. there's a silver lining in this which is that there are a lot of co commonalities between the two plans. >> was this intention by the white house to pressure congres
not believe in. whether it's this one, john paul ii or the next pope not everything he says is infallible. there is a hierarchy of truth. when it comes to more what is more authoritative and less authoritative and not everything is weighed equally. >> cenk: thank you for not giving me a yes or no. powerful stories to tell, and we appreciate hearing from both of you. >> thanks. >> thanks. >> cenk: now when we come back, well we got good news on military benefits. it turns out same-sex couples will be getting some. is it too late for some couples? and how much of those benefits will they actually be receiving. we'll tell you a story that is powerful. >> she would not be able to coordinate because of the difference of marriage act. she would be recognized as a friend. cheap is good. and sushi, good. but cheap sushi, not so good. it's like that super-low rate on not enough car insurance. pretty sketchy. ♪ ♪ and then there are the good decisions. like esurance. their coverage counselor tool helps you choose the right coverage for you at a great price. [ stomach gro
or more like john paul, ii? they will tell you only god knows the answer to that question. >> at www.ktvu.com we have dedicated a tab to the pope's resignation. you'll find more stories on choosing the next pope and the procedure. >>> president obama awarded the military's medal of honor to a veteran from northern california today. staff sergeant clint romesha served two tours in iraq and one from afghanistan. in 2009 his combat outpost was ambushed before dawn and outnumbered by 3 horntail ban. he led a charge into fly -- by the taliban. he led a charge into flying bullets. he was struck by shrapnel but continued to fight during the ambush that killed eight soldiers. >>> it's been dry around here as we go through january and february. we've had some of the dryest time between all of january and this much of february. so basically january 1st to february 11th. it is the fifth dryest in san francisco's history going back to 1852. oakland .53, the second dryest. so this period from january 1st to today has been really dry. it's showing up in the records. rain not coming any time soon,
. john boehner, eric cantor, and paul ryan, and paul ryan and cantor are going to keep boehner to the right. i mean, cantor and ryan's advisors have told us privately there is no opening for tax revenue in this deal at all. i'm want sure if john boehner would do it independently of them, but the people that we've seen who have been completely ineffective are the people on the house armed services committee, the people who make these decisions usually, but the chairman has not been able to sway boehner at all. we've seen the stalemate because of that, and cantor and rooen are going to keep boehner on the right. >> people outside the process are saying this is the dumbest way to do business, to have a meat ax approach and have across the board cuts. yes, it does achieve some budget savings, but does it not in any kind of intelligent way of planning. >> which is why if you talk to the people on capitol hill, the people who are making these decisions, they say that down the road if there are huge economic damages -- i mean, we don't really know what's going to happen to the economy
john paul decided that all those cases would now come to his office. so from 2001 to 2005, he saw every case. so he is the most knowledgeable person in the world about these issues. >> so what happened to these cases now? >> it's a very good question. i think it's the fundamental question for the church, because it's clear that these are crimes. they're not since, they're crimes. and they've also been covered up in a rather methodical way by the church around the world. >> your research took almost two years. and in your research, are these isolated incidents or is it habitual within the church? >> i think what you see is obviously not every priest is a pedophile. in fact, they're a rather small percentage of priests. but what you do see is patterns that emerge all over the world. for a long time, the vatican said oh, this was an american problem. but now we see this problem cropping up in australia, in germany, in brussels, in ireland, where it's been huge, in italy. so what you see in these -- you know, what you see is patterns. and the patterns are almost always of cover-up. instead
. >> well said. >> amen. >> i think it shows a lot of humility. in april of 2005 when pope john paul ii died we broadcasted "hardball" from rome. as we closed our last show from there, let's listen. look at these people standing for hours, day and night, through the avenues of rome, packed together as if they had been caught and crushed in an industrial strength trash compacter. there they stood seeking no edge, plotting no photo opportunity, playing none of the games that people do in politics, in business, in so much of life. this is no pub lisible stunt or initial stock offering or inside deal or anything but the purest most obvious most grandly transparent display of individual devotion. voting with your feet. >> thanks four your wise and warm words. thanks for coming on and enl deon, mr. america and french canadian and all kind of things. >>> dick cheney from the sublime to the ridiculous. dick cheney can't stand the fact that his side lost the election, dick. that he and his neocons are under assault and in retreat thank god. he's saying president obama is picking second class people.
, but will the cardinals choose someone more like the scholarly benedict xvi or more like john paul, ii? they will tell you only god knows the answer to that question. >> at www.ktvu.com we have dedicated a tab to the pope's resignation. you'll find more stories on choosing the next pope and the procedure. >>> president obama awarded the military's medal of honor to a veteran from northern california today. staff sergeant clint romesha served two tours in iraq and one from afghanistan. in 2009 his combat outpost was ambushed before dawn and outnumbered by 3 horntail ban. he led a charge into fly -- by the taliban. he led a charge into flying bullets. he was struck by shrapnel but continued to fight during the ambush that killed eight soldiers. >>> it's been dry around here as we go through january and february. we've had some of the dryest time between all of january and this much of february. so basically january 1st to february 11th. it is the fifth dryest in san francisco's history going back to 1852. oakland .53, the second dryest. so this period from january 1st to today has been really dry. it's show
should step down when they don't feel up to it. we saw john paul ii suffered through the last years of his papacy and maybe he wanted to avoid that. a former german cardinal joseph ratzinger was conservative faith and modern issues, relations between catholics and jews and muslims, and especially the widespread charges against members of his catholic church and child abuse. the question now is, who gets to be picked as the new pope of the billion plus catholics around the world. the speculation he could come from africa or south america, somewhere in the developing world, history could be made, but as you note, megyn, the pope according to his defenders and supporters making a very courageous move. >> megyn: greg, thank you. we're hearing reports that the president could call for a new round of federal spending in his state of the union address tomorrow night. a plan compared to his previous stimulus plan and we just received new fox news polls last week asking voters if they believe the stimulus of 2009 actually worked. just 34% said yes. 60% said, no, it did not work and only 29%
't happened in 600 years or so. i've read where even the private secretary to pope john paul the ii is criticizing this pope or critical of the decision at least to decide to step down before death. >> reporter: i read that as well, and since then that secretary, the private secretary has sent out context on that and said he didn't mean to be critical cat all. in essence what he was saying was, you carry the cross until the very end. but pope benedict the xvi says i know what my duties are, i know what i have to do for the people of the church, i've got even so old, i'm so frail and my mind is that i don't feel like i can do it any more. so he says nor the goo for the gaffe the church i havchurch i haven't step down. the last time it happened in 1415 edward the xii was dealing with multiple people trying to be the pope and times were very difficult, because the church was the law at the time almost exclusively. times are quite different. this pope said look i think this is the right thing to do and now the cardinals will come in and choose another. there is a great deal of anticipat
-day timetable to start the process to choose a new pope were set in 1996 by pope john paul ii and only could be changed by another pope. that is what ben dick today benedict did today, one of his last official acts. he gave his final sunday blessing to huge crowds in st. peter's square. no date is set for the conclave to begin. in order to have a new pope by the start of holy week, a new pope would have be installed by sunday, march 17th. the date change comes amid the news there will be one less cardinal voting in the enclave. cardinal keith o'brien of scotland, britain's highest ranking catholic leader is retiring and will not be attending. his resignation of archbishop of edinburgh is part of a mandatory age requirement because he is 75 years old but it comes in the wake of allegations of misconduct. british newspapers report that o'brien has been accused by three current priests and one former priest of acting inappropriately with them in the 19 80s. the cardinal said he will not monday that he will not attend the conclave because he does not want media attention focused on him dur
, pope benedict xvi does have something on pope john paul ii, the catholic church experienced a 6% increase in favorability, up from 56% during pope john paul ii's tenure and that's what the survey says. >>> coming up, she beats out her husband in almost every popularity poll. now michelle obama is back on the road and we'll look at what the second term may hold for the first lady. >>> first, the latest from south africa on where the olympic star accused of murder is now a day after being released on bail. you're watching msnbc. i've always had to keep my eye on her... but, i didn't always watch out for myself. with so much noise about health care... i tuned it all out. with unitedhealthcare, i get information that matters... my individual health profile. not random statistics. they even reward me for addressing my health risks. so i'm doing fine... but she's still going to give me a heart attack. we're more than 78,000 people looking out for more than 70 million americans. that's health in numbers. unitedhealthcare. >>> more than 100 days after hurricane sand e some storm victims
he addressed you first but he and benedict would chat when benedict was waiting to see pope john paul. >> completely open. >> reporter: what was he like to talk to? >> very -- he would ask me what my interests were and how i felt and how i saw things. >> reporter: and with a sense of humor, like when benedict offered to sign widmer's copy of a book that he written which was pretty thick. >> when i gave it to him he said, you're really reading this? and i said, i'm trying. he said, it helps to do it in small steps. >> reporter: but he also had a personal crisis as a guard, spending his first christmas away from home. john paul helped him through that. >> i sort of had a meltdown and right at that moment he comes out of his apartment and he noticed and he reached out to me and he thanked me for being there and he gave me courage. >> reporter: what were you doing? were you crying? >> yeah. >> reporter: you were? >> i stopped crying but he in theed my red eyes. >> reporter: as for what's to come, the top job isn't what we think. >> the pope is the end of your life. you have to give up all
the memory of benedict's predecessor, john paul ii. have a listen to this. >> people said, if anyone should have resigned, it was he. parkinson parkinson's, couldn't get around. i think it is the image, the visual image of a man incapacitated. people say, well, how much is he really doing that? how much does he have his hands on the pulse of what is happening? >> chris cuomo this morning. father, do you think just straight up do you think his successor might find wisdom in the notion of hanging it up early, maybe set a precedent here? >> i agree with the quotations of the priest. we need a person, a leader, a real leader with good health, a wise man, continuing to train and i agree with benedict sistine and he has few guideline -- very clear, if i don't have the health, spirituality, mentality, and everything, i will resign. and it is simple for us. the doctrine is continuing to be the same. i think it is an example for everybody, the leader, the church, continuing. it is much better. resign now. >> italian popes, think of polish, currently german. looking at the statistics and the numbers
for participating. andrew koppelman is the john paul stevens professor of law at northwestern university. he received his bachelor's from the university of chicago and his jd and phd from yale law school. his scholarship focuses on issues at the intersection of law and political philosophy. he is the author of "defending american religious neutrality," and several other books. and more than 80 articles and scholarly journals. sherif girgis is a phd student in philosophy at princeton university and a jd candidate at yale law school. after graduating from princeton, where he won prizes for best senior thesis in ethics and philosophy, as well as the dante society prize, he obtained a degree from the university of oxford as a rhodes scholar. he is the author of a recent book "what is marriage," described as the most formidable defense of traditional marriage ever written. we are grateful to him for participating in this event. >> thank you so much for the introduction. thanks, everyone, for coming. a special thanks to professor koppelman. i have a pleasure of speaking on the panel with him befor
grateful for him to part -- for participating. andrew koppelman is the john paul stevens professor of law at northwestern university. he received his bachelor's from the university of chicago and his jd and phd from yale law school. his scholarship focuses on issues at the intersection of law and political philosophy. he is the author of "defending american religious neutrality," and several other books. and more than 80 articles and scholarly journals. sherif girgis is a phd student in philosophy at princeton university and a jd candidate at yale law school. after graduating from princeton , where he won prizes for best senior thesis in ethics and philosophy, as well as the dante society prize, he obtained a degree from the university of oxford as a rhodes scholar. he is the author of a recent book "what is marriage," described as the most formidable defense of traditional marriage ever written. we are grateful to him for participating in this event. >> thank you so much for the introduction. thanks, everyone, for coming. a special thankso professor koppelman. i have a pleasure of speaki
discrimination. but being a judge, and it's a pretty good job to have, think of my colleague, justice john paul stevens who remain on the court until he was 90, and is still an avid golfer and tennis player, has recently written a book, not about himself, but about the five chiefs that he had known from the time he was a law clerk until the time he retired from the court. so, next question. [laughter] >> justice ginsburg, you've had an amazing career and are leaving your legacy in the law. looking back on your life, although there's still more to do, but looking back on what you have done so far, is there anything you would do differently? >> it's a question, and i don't ask myself, and i'll give you two pieces of advice i was given in that regard. when i was a brand-new judge on the d.c. circuit, one of my senior colleagues said ruth, i've been at this business a long time, and one thing i'd like to embark to you, do your best job in each case, but when it's over, when the opinion is out, don't look back. don't worry about things that have passed. go on to the next case, and give it your all.
this passed the congress, the republican congress, it passed with votes from john boehner, and paul ryan said when it happened he got 98% of what he wanted. only republicans gave us the sequester, only they can stop it. >> announcer: this is the "bill press show." [ ♪ theme ♪ ] >> stephanie: whatever, jim. jim is so competitive jacki. in the parking structure he's like ha ha, i got in the building first! >> into the building first? >> really? that does it for you? >> you compete about that? >> stephanie: love letter for jacki. dear steph. huge fan and podcast subscriber. everyone involved makes the show fantastic. you guide the show along masterfully. chris is more than he's given credit for. silliness occurs when healthcare geek jacki is in the studio with us. any way to have her there with you more often? >> well, there would be if jim ward didn't constantly sexually harass her. >> there is that whole restraining order. >> i'm several feet away from her. >> that's what the restraining order says. >> stephanie: why can't we have nice things. here she is in the current news cent
must be an expert in medicine. i would wonder why he assumes that he knows more than people like john or paul, the nobel prize winner in economics. and it seems to me that sequestration is more a blackmail issue. guest: again, sequestration was the mechanism used by the president, the white house, in order to get the bill passed that raised the debt limit in august 2011. if anyone's dealing with blackmail, i reference your call to the white house, please, because they were the ones who came up with this idea. the president thought it was a bad idea, had the ability to veet oh the bill in august 2011, but it was passed under his signature. he signed it and went on vacation, if you'll remember, went to his 50th birthday party, if i recall correctly. look, paul drugman and i probably disagree about almost everything except the call of day. host: the caller may have missed the introduction of you. er a doctor. give us a little bit of your background. guest: well, i am a physician. i went to the university of texas medical school at houston,graduated in 1977, did my residency in a obstetri
starting at noon eastern on c-span radio. "meet the press" at noon. john mccain, and mark kelly, co- founder of americans for responsible solutions on guns in america. at 1:00, guests include paul ryan, castro. chris wallace and lyndsay grahnm and rand paul. "state of the union" with jack reed and chuck schumer from new york. also, the chair of the house committee john rogers. haley barber, corey booker, and donald wharl. all starting at noone aste eastn on c-span radio. you can also listen with our free apps for your iphone, android, or black burry. -- blackberry. [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] >> i think the women were interested in politics but had no ability to express that so they were attracted to bed who were going to be politically active or were already politically active. >> i fight each of them intriguing. probably half of them because they are so obscure. i think half of these would then probably would be almost totally unrecognizable to most men and women on the street. >> c-span premiere
it reminded me of was the clint eastwood ad for chrysler. and the advantage they have is paul harvey is not going to come back with a chair at a republican convention. but i thought it was a beautiful ad. you almost expected to hear john cougar mellencamp's old songs that we used to sing at farm aid concerts is what i was thinking as i was watching. >> was there a political message there at all, do you think, karen? >> i do, actually. as it was playing, sort of thinking there is a slice of america that we're losing. i mean, you talked than, frankly, just before this segment. and there are very real reasons why family farmers and small farmers are struggling in this country. and, you know, there were beautiful images and things we should be very proud of in terms of the american ethic of hard work and all of that. and yet we're not taking care of those values and not cherishing those values and doing the things we can to preserve that in the ways that i think we could be. >> jonathan, what about the ad? the mayors against illegal guns took out. effective? your thoughts. >> yeah, i thi
to be in a position of -- >> it's more than that. >> cancel out. >> i'm sorry to jump in. but, john, it's a lot more than just mechanics and who is a good candidate. it's about ideology, positioning. mr. aiken was somebody who believed there are examples of legitimate rape, something paul ryan, a vp candidate for the united states embraced at one time. these are ideological issues. the republican party really has shifted so far to the right that somebody like karl rove, who is used to winning national elections, sees the writing on the wall. if the republican party doesn't change, they'll be a minority party pretty much forever. >> it's one thing to look down the line and try to pick winners and losers. and one thing we've got from congressman tom price who gave a response to this at the national review breakfast saying, quote, we have lost seats we should not have lost because of a failure of communication is a failure of message, a failure of coherence. clearly, we can't continue the same processes we've had in the past. so david, you have to admit that, you know, while they're looking at what kar
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 53 (some duplicates have been removed)